Underwear Making

Underwear Making VS Lingerie Sewing

Underwear making refers to all undergarments and nightwear as opposed to Lingerie making which for me covers only the delicate ‘sexy’ undergarments not directly related to bra’s and pants. We’re talking slips, garters and negligees. Basically frilly underwear making and sewing. If you want to learn how to make lingerie you need to master some fairly tricky and flimsy fabrics like satins and lace. It’s a form of underwear making that involves a lot of stretch fabrics and elastics. These are also used to make panties and sew bras.

 

Bra & Panty Making

Bra making can get confusing but the biggest hurdle is getting familiar with the basics i.e. the parts of the bra, the sewing techniques and the fabrics etc. Once you’re used to sewing elastic, what to use where and how to insert a bra wire, sewing a bra together is relatively quick and straightforward. If it seems confusing just concentrate on learning the basics and the rest will come. Once you have located a selection of decent bra patterns, found some bra wires that suit your frame and build up a stash of gorgeous bra fabrics you won’t ever want to go back to buying bras ‘off the rack’ in stores. Nothing will ever fit or feel as comfortable to you as a bra pattern developed uniquely for you.

Making panties is probably the easiest and quickest underwear make you can sew. There are a variety of types of panty, all of which only really require the ability to sew elastic with a zig zag stitch. Panty fabric can be cotton, satin, lace or a variety of other materials, but what all panty fabric has in common is that you need very little of it. A fat quarter can easily produce two pairs or more!

Panties have got to be one of the easiest things you can learn how to sew. Whether you want to sew knickers, briefs, high waisted panties, thongs or boy shorts; so little effort, time or fabric are needed. So panty construction and designing panties is probably where I would suggest the beginner underwear maker starts.

 

 

 Here is an excerpt from the How To Underwear Wiki on special considerations to take when sewing underwear – 

 

Comfort – Underwear should always be comfortable before it is stylish (and it should be both ideally). This obviously doesn’t apply to lingerie designed to be worn only in the bedroom, i.e put on just to be taken off again. The majority of underwear is made however, with the intension of being worn all day against the skin on some of the most sensitive areas of the body. So always consider how comfortable your creations are, even if you’re planing to make your own underwear for no one but yourself. It can be the most beautiful thing you’ve ever sewn but if your DIY underwear cuts in, rubs or doesn’t fit you’re not going to want to wear it.

 

Fit – A no brainer, if it doesn’t fit correctly your custom underwear won’t just be uncomfortable but it’ll look unflattering too. So take the time to perfect the underwear pattern by making it up in some cheap/scrap fabric and adjusting it for the wearers body before you get going with your pretty underwear makes. The other less obvious thing to consider is the style and support of your chosen underwear design. Is it suitable for its use/the wearers body. You wouldn’t want to wear lace panties at the gym, the fabric would be unsuitable for the activity. Similarly you wouldn’t want spaghetti bra straps on a bra for a large bust, they would cut into the shoulders on account of the amble bosom weight which again comes back to my previous point about comfort.

 

Color – As well as a style choice, color needs to be carefully considered for a completely unique reason when underwear making – because underwear is worn underneath other clothing. Sometimes a natural skin tone is preferred to conceal the presence of underwear, other times a contrasting color is used against the outerwear to make a statement. How your underwear makes will look underneath your clothing is something you should consider from the moment you start to design your underwear or pick your fabrics and patterns.